13 Serious Things to Know Before Bleaching Your Hair

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Bleaching your hair can be a fun pastime for some people. You can have your hair transformed from one color to another instantaneously. In other words, it’s a very cool and fascinating activity that many people have tried at least once in their lives. Nevertheless, if you are one of the many who want to bleach their hair, there are some things you need to know before. I mean, it’s not just as simple as taking a box of bleach to your head and rinsing after 30 minutes right? No! There are serious things to consider before bleaching your hair. In fact, the method you choose will depend on how much damage you want to do and how quickly you want results.

There are also other things that you need to know befor bleaching your hair. But before starting it is important to understand what bleach does to your hair.

How bleaching effects your hair                  

Bleaching works by removing pigment from the shaft of each strand of hair using chemicals like hydrogen peroxide or bleach powder (sodium perborate). This opens up the cuticle layer of each strand so that more light can get through it, making it appear lighter than its natural shade, even though it’s actually damaging your strands in the process.

13 Serious Things to Know Before Bleaching Your Hair

1. You need to get a professional consultation

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You need to get a professional consultation before bleaching your hair.

The reason why you need a professional consultation is because they are the ones who can tell you if bleaching is right for you or not. They will be able to tell you if your hair can take it or not, and if there are any risks involved with bleaching your hair.

If this is something that interests you then go ahead and find someone who specializes in bleaching, but make sure that they know what they are doing because some people can do more damage to your hair than good if they don’t know what they are doing.

2. It’s important to do a strand test                                              

It’s important to do a strand test before bleaching your hair. This is a quick and simple way of seeing how your hair will react to bleach.

The strand test will tell you whether or not your hair is healthy enough to be bleached, and also how much damage the bleach may cause.

A strand test is exactly what it sounds like: You take some strands of hair from your head and apply bleach to them in order to see how they will react before applying it to your entire head. This way, if something goes wrong, you’ll only end up bleaching a small section of your hair rather than the whole thing.

3. Be Realistic About Your Color Goals                                    

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If you’re going to bleach your hair, you need to know what type of results you can expect. Be realistic about your color goals.

If you want to go from brunette to blond, don’t expect to get blonde on the first application. You may need to lighten your hair a few shades before getting there. For example, if you have dark brown hair, it may take multiple applications of bleach to get it light enough for platinum highlights or a light golden shade.

4. Your hair type matters when it comes to bleaching

How strong a bleach you need to use depends on your hair type. If you have fine hair, then a lightening kit will work just fine, but if you have thick, curly locks then you’ll likely need a stronger one.

If you want to keep your hair healthy, it’s important to choose a product that’s right for your hair type. It also helps to know what you can expect from each type of bleach so that you can choose the one that’s right for you.

5. Your hair color history matters when it comes to bleaching. 

The color history of your hair matters because it affects how long it takes to bleach your hair. If you have dark hair, it will take longer to bleach than if you had light colored hair. This is because the darker your base color is, the more melanin there is in your strands. Melanin is a pigment that gives hair its color. The more melanin there is, the harder it will be for the hair to be stripped of its pigment with bleach alone.

So, if you’re looking to bleach your hair, keep in mind that it may take a bit longer if your hair is dark.

6. Remember the bleach can burn your scalp if left on too long

Bleach can burn your scalp if left on too long. The longer the bleach is left on your scalp, the greater chance of it burning.

Bleach contains peroxide, which oxidizes and causes a chemical reaction with other compounds present in your hair. This reaction produces heat that can damage your hair follicles, resulting in permanent scarring and even bald spots on your head.

If you want to use bleach but don’t want to risk burning your scalp, use a low-volume peroxide product that has a lower concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This type of product will not produce as much heat as regular products do.

7. It can totally change your hair texture

You may be surprised to learn that the bleaching process can actually change your hair texture. It’s not guaranteed, but it’s possible.

If you’re going for a dramatic color change with dramatic results, this isn’t as much of an issue. But if you were hoping to go from dark brown to light blonde with minimal damage (and no visible roots), then this might be an issue for you.

Here are some things that can happen:

  • Your hair could become more fragile and break more easily than normal. This can happen when the cuticle gets damaged during bleaching or if the developer used was too strong for your hair.
  • Your strands could become drier overall because of all those harsh ingredients used in chemical treatments like bleaching or dyeing sessions; dryness causes them crack when they grow longer than usual which makes them weaker against environmental factors like sun exposure come summertime heatwaves.
  • They could also get frizzier than usual due so much air being trapped within their structure.

8. You need to make sure your hair is healthy.                    

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Before bleaching your hair you need to make sure your hair is healthy. Healthy hair is less likely to break when exposed to extreme heat (like bleaching). The best way to check is by running your fingers through the length of your strands and feeling for kinks or bumps: If you feel any rough spots at all, it’s time for a trim.

You should also check the condition of your scalp: If it feels flaky or dry, itchiness or dandruff could indicate an underlying issue like dandruff or seborrheic dermatitis (an overgrowth of yeast). Then you need to understand that it’s not the right time to bleach  your hair

9. You might need to cut some length off your hair before bleaching.

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The most important thing to know about bleaching is that your hair needs to be healthy. If the ends are damaged, they will break and look weird after the bleach has been applied. You can use a clarifying shampoo to remove buildup and cleanse your hair, but if your ends are in poor condition, you might need to cut them off before bleaching.

This will allow you to create more volume in the root area by cutting off some of the weight at the bottom of your head.

10. All bleaching products aren’t created equal.

If you’re considering going platinum blonde or lightening your locks, there are a couple of things to keep in mind before you start bleaching.

First off, understand that not all bleaching products are designed to lighten hair evenly. Some products work better on certain types of hair than others, so it’s important to pick the right one for your needs.

Secondly, there are several different types of bleach on the market and each type has its own set of pros and cons. For instance, some brands will give you great results but may not be gentle enough on your hair while others may be too harsh and damage your hair as much as they lighten it.

11. The volume of bleach is important.

The volume of bleach is important for your hair. If you have dark hair, don’t go past a level 10.

If you want to bleach your hair light blonde or white, don’t use a level 10. Your hair will not only be damaged, but it will also take longer to grow out.

Bleaching levels are measured by numbers. The higher the number, the lighter the shade of blonde or white your hair will become.

12. Talk to your stylist about Olaplex.

If you’re going for the platinum look, talk to your hairstylist about using Olaplex in conjunction with your bleach process.

It won’t just protect your hair from breakage but also help restore damaged strands back to their natural state after bleaching them.

13. You’ll need to spend a lot of time on it.

Before bleaching your hair you need to make sure your hair is healthy. Healthy hair is less likely to break when exposed to extreme heat (like bleaching). The best way to check is by running your fingers through the length of your strands and feeling for kinks or bumps: If you feel any rough spots at all, it’s time for a trim.

You should also check the condition of your scalp: If it feels flaky or dry, itchiness or dandruff could indicate an underlying issue like dandruff or seborrheic dermatitis (an overgrowth of yeast). Then you need to understand that it’s not the right time to bleach  your hair.

Conclusion

In the end, I hope that these points have been helpful. They’ve certainly been eye-opening for me and helped me to better understand some of the complications that come along with bleaching hair. With that in mind, I urge every prospective bleach-head to take these 15 points into consideration before bleaching or dyeing their hair; most importantly, I would never want anyone to make a decision they’ll regret.

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